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Attorney for Kirbyville CISD to appeal judge's decision on restraining order

Sara Leon, the attorney for KCISD, says she believes the judge erred because the doctrine of governmental immunity protects the district from the court’s jurisdiction.

The attorney representing Kirbyville Consolidated Independent School District in a legal dispute with the high school principal's family in connection to his death last month is appealing a judge's recent decision against the district.

Earlier this week, Judge Baylor Wortham amended a temporary restraining order compelling KCISD to preserve records pertaining to a dozen of its officials and Region 5 Education Service Center executive director Danny Lovett.

Sara Leon, the attorney for KCISD, says she believes the judge erred because the doctrine of governmental immunity protects the district from the court’s jurisdiction.

What that means basically is under this doctrine, there are very limited reasons for a district to be taken to court, and she says this search of documents is not one of them.

In this appeal to the Ninth Court of Appeals in Beaumont, Leon’s representing all district employees named in the temporary restraining order, and the motion for depositions.

Reeves' family is "investigating the facts and circumstances regarding the death of Dennis Reeves in order to determine (1) the truth of the facts and circumstances and (2) whether they have any right to recovery as a result of Reeves' death," according court documents filed Monday by their attorney Chip Ferguson.

But attorneys for the school and its officials say the requests are broad and overreaching. They released a statement later Tuesday saying they still believe any restraining order is unnecessary "because the school district has zero interest in destroying records of Mr. Reeves’s employment with the district or the circumstances surrounding his suicide."

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